Despite significant investment and anti-corruption capacity building in the past decades, "most systematically corrupt countries are considered to be just as corrupt now as they were before the anti-corruption interventions"(1). Statements like this are indicative of the frustration shared by practitioners and scholars alike at the apparent lack of success in controlling corruption worldwide and point to the need to rethink our understanding of the factors that fuel corruption and make it so hard to abate. 

The Basel Institute’s contribution to the EU-funded ANTICORRP research consortium through the Work Package “The ethnographic study of corruption” (WP4) has come to a close with the acceptance by the European Commission of the second set of publications emanating from this research effort.

Chapter 7 in Corruption in Public Administration: An Ethnographic Approach, edited by Davide Torsello.

Despite the growth in literature on political corruption, contributions from field research are still exiguous. This book, edited by Davide Torsello, provides a timely and much needed addition to current research, bridging the gap between macro level quantitative indicators of corruption and micro level qualitative evidence through an innovative ethnographic approach to the study of corruption and integrity in public administration.

This paper focuses on local understandings of corrupt practices among indigenous groups in rural areas of Mexico and links the exercise of particular communitarian practices and social norms  among those groups to the effectiveness of social accountability mechanisms in the Mexican health sector.

This study was undertaken as part of the Basel Institute's contribution to ANTICORRP WP4 "the ethnographic study of corruption."

Despite the growth in literature on political corruption, contributions from field research are still exiguous. This book edited by Davide Torsello, includes two chapters co-authored by Claudia Baez Camargo, head of the Institute’s research division. It provides a timely and much needed addition to current research, bridging the gap between macro level quantitative indicators of corruption and micro level qualitative evidence through an innovative ethnographic approach to the study of corruption and integrity in public administration.