Chapter 8 in Corruption in Public Administration: An Ethnographic Approach, edited by Davide Torsello.

Despite the growth in literature on political corruption, contributions from field research are still exiguous. This book, edited by Davide Torsello, provides a timely and much needed addition to current research, bridging the gap between macro level quantitative indicators of corruption and micro level qualitative evidence through an innovative ethnographic approach to the study of corruption and integrity in public administration.

Chapter 7 in Corruption in Public Administration: An Ethnographic Approach, edited by Davide Torsello.

Despite the growth in literature on political corruption, contributions from field research are still exiguous. This book, edited by Davide Torsello, provides a timely and much needed addition to current research, bridging the gap between macro level quantitative indicators of corruption and micro level qualitative evidence through an innovative ethnographic approach to the study of corruption and integrity in public administration.

Power and influence analysis can be used to assess corruption vulnerabilities in the public sector. This approach helps identify powerful stakeholders that should be engaged to achieve maximum impact for anti-corruption strategies. It also helps reveal informal political networks and relationships that can hamper anti-corruption efforts.

The UK Department for International Development (DFID), through its East Africa Research Fund (EARF), commissioned the Basel Institute on Governance to conduct the research project “Corruption, Social Norms and Behaviours in East Africa” aiming at shedding light into those “[behavioural] factors that influence the propensity for poor people to engage in, resist and report ‘corrupt transactions’” in three East African countries, namely, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

The UK Department for International Development (DFID), through its East Africa Research Fund (EARF), commissioned the Basel Institute on Governance to conduct the research project “Corruption, Social Norms and Behaviours in East Africa” aiming at shedding light into those “[behavioural] factors that influence the propensity for poor people to engage in, resist and report ‘corrupt transactions’” in three East African countries, namely, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

The UK Department for International Development (DFID), through its East Africa Research Fund (EARF), commissioned the Basel Institute on Governance to conduct the research project “Corruption, Social Norms and Behaviours in East Africa” aiming at shedding light into those “[behavioural] factors that influence the propensity for poor people to engage in, resist and report ‘corrupt transactions’” in three East African 
countries, namely, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

This paper focuses on local understandings of corrupt practices among indigenous groups in rural areas of Mexico and links the exercise of particular communitarian practices and social norms  among those groups to the effectiveness of social accountability mechanisms in the Mexican health sector.

This study was undertaken as part of the Basel Institute's contribution to ANTICORRP WP4 "the ethnographic study of corruption."

This paper highlights the key findings of a study conducted as part of the Basel Institute's contribution to ANTICORRP WP4 "the ethnographic study of corruption."

It explores the attitudes towards corrupt practices in the health sector among citizens in Dar es Salaam and how those are linked to coping mechanisms that have been spontaneously organised at the community level as well as to generalised perceptions on the role of the state and the prevailing legal order in contemporary Tanzania.

Strengthening Health System Accountability: a WHO European Region Multi-Country Study

This publication is the output of the latest collaborative project between the Basel Institute on Governance and the World Health Organisation Regional Office for Europe.

The document, which is co-edited by Juan Tello of WHO and Claudia Baez Camargo of the Basel Institute, offers a comprehensive view of the various manners in which different WHO member states have strived to improve their governance performance and specially throws light as to how different strategies to improve accountability have been rolled out responding to variations across institutional frameworks.